Why a Short-Term View and poor Math Skills are Bad for your Business

OK, I might have frightened many of you.

Math?

Well, the good news is that we’re not going to do any regressions or differential equations today.  So…breathe slowly into the bag; and let’s talk.  I am going to do the math FOR you.

Many of you own a business that is very stressful for you.  You constantly worry about cash flow.  You feel pain because your team does not seem to care about anything but their paychecks.  And, you sometimes wish that you could wave a magic wand, so people could “Get it” about the value you provide. You might even have to discount your prices, which drives you crazy (after all, you are worth more, aren’t you?).

To make matters worse:  you keep thinking things will “get better”; but, six months go by, and it’s just as tight and stressful as it was six months ago.  One year passes, and you wonder why things seem to be just as bad, or worse, than they were at the same time last year.

So, let’s do a little math (I’ll walk you through it 🙂 ).

  1. What if you invested $15,000 over six months to learn some proven tactics to get new customers and build a more motivated team?  Or, you invested that $15,000 to train 3 or 4 of your managers with a Management Training program; so they could  close some of their skill gaps?
  2. What if, based on extensive data, that investment were proven to get a 5-1 return (so, exchange $15,000 for $75,000 in one year)?  BUT, to be conservative, you won’t believe anything more than a 2.5-1 return (so, you invest $15,000 and get $37,500 back in 6 months – Net profit is $37,500 – $15,000:  $22,500).
  3. Then, you were able to take that $22,500 and grow it just 3% per year for 10 years.

Over 10 years, with a conservative view, your $15,000 investment would be worth $257,937. 

If you took the full 5:1 return, and grew it at 5%/year; you would have $15,000 become $754,674That’s a quarter of a million dollars extra in your pocket, for a $15,000 investment.

This is why the short-term view of fearfully holding onto money limits the greatness of so many business owners.  The simple math is that, holding onto the $15,000, with no change in how you do things in your business, will just result in more of the same stress and a return of $0, won’t it?

The fact is, whether you are talking about investing in a coach/consultant or a management training program; your long-term benefits are huge.   Here is a personal case study:  I invested in my own coach even when I could not afford one; because I realized the value of having someone to get me to think outside my personal experiences and make decisions even when I was not sure of the potential results.   It’s why, when I owned a business coaching franchise, my business was 3 times as big as the average coach in that system (which made me the top Franchisee).       All franchisees had the same “system,” but my coach made me prospect when I did not want to; he gave me strategies that I had not considered; he helped me focus when I was looking at “shiny objects”; and he even helped me realize why a strategy that HAD been working suddenly lost effectiveness.   Even a coach needs a coach.

There is a reason that an elite athlete invests in coaches, even though he has an enormous amount of talent.  The one-tenth of a second that his coach helps him cut from his 40-yard dash time could be worth millions of dollars.

For a business owner, there might be one thing you or your managers are not doing that, with the right training, you could discover can make you millions of dollars, or remove 90% of the stress you experience every day.

Am I the right coach/consultant for you?  Most likely not:  unless you are in the restaurant or hospitality business (private coaching/consulting), or have a management team helping run your business (our classroom-based training program).   But, I promise you that there IS someone out there who is a great fit for you.   And, doing the math, thinking that you are saving money by not making the investment in closing your skill gaps is absolutely bad for your business.

Take Action Today, and start your path to investing in your future success.

I am connected to a lot of coaches/consultants; so feel free to connect with me on Facebook, Twitter, or Linkedin; read what they write and post, then contact those who might be the best fit for you.

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Comments

  • Frank  On November 12, 2012 at 12:00 pm

    Please explain the math. $22,500 invested at 3% compounded annually for 10 years produces less than $8,000 in interest.

    • Roger Boneno  On November 12, 2012 at 12:28 pm

      Hi Frank,

      The math is based on compounding of interest on the profit growth. In year 1, the PROFIT improvement, on a conservative basis, is $22,500. That profit comes from new customers, better pricing, more cost control. So, as long as you continue to do the right things, the next year you have that $22,500 PLUS growth (minimum assumption fo 3%). So, for companies doing the right things to grow profit, improvement becomes like an annuity – a STREAM of payments.

      Year 1 Profit: $22,500 ($37,500 less $15,000 initial investment)
      Year 2 Profit: $23,175 ($22,500 plus $625 of interest
      Year 3 – 10 keeps growing.

      Does this make sense?

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